DJ's Recommend(DJのオススメ)

2022.05.23[Mon] 09:00

DJ's Recommend(DJのオススメ)

【DJ Recommendations for Rainy Season and Summer Prep】

As the weather continues to heat up, you can really feel that we're heading into the summer months. We're very nearly into June now, just a week or so left of May. However, before we get into the full heat of summer, we have rainy season first....

 

Japanese Summer and Its Rainy Season

If you've been here for a while, you'll know that one big characteristic of summer in Japan is its mugginess. It is hot and humid here. And June is when Tsuyu, or rainy season, shows up bringing in lots of clouds and lots and lots of rain. In Japanese, the beginning of rainy season is referred to as “tsuyu-iri” and the end is “tsuyu-ake.” I'm not sure there's really a good translation for that other than entering rainy season and the lifting or clearing of rainy season...if you have a better word for it, let me know. In Fukuoka, the end of rainy season is typically around the middle of July, but it really depends on the area and that year. And once it does end, we get “mousho”, which is very very hot, or extreme heat, and means hot days with temperatures often from 35 degrees and above. So, as we move into June, make sure you prepare so that you are completely ready for summer.

I remember when I first came to Japan and experienced my first rainy season, I was shocked at how wet I got even with an umbrella. The rain was falling so hard it was bouncing back up off the ground and splashing me. Just an umbrella won't cut it during rainy season. I now have a good pair of rain boots, an assortment of raincoats and ponchos, depending on how heavy the rain is, and of course, several sturdy umbrellas. I cycle to most places so one of my rain coats is extra long and has a expandable back so that I can carry my backpack underneath it. Once the rainy season is over and the heat of summer hits, I'm alright. Michigan isn't known for such hot summers at all, and summer isn't all that long either, but I can handle the hot weather and I love going to the beach. However, I always have a handkerchief with me, as the summer is pretty sweaty, and never leave the house without water and a hat of sorts, which leads me into our next topic today, ways to avoid heat stroke and sunburns.

 

Measures to Prevent Heatstroke and Sunburns

You'll often hear the word “Necchushou”, in Japanese, come summer. This means heatstroke and it's Japan's biggest climate illness. Symptoms of heatstroke include dizziness, nausea, sluggishness and headaches and may result from spending a long time outdoors, under the sun, or doing physical activities in the summer heat. You can actually get heatstroke, not only from being outdoors but also indoors, so be careful as you deal with the heat of summer.

So, make sure you avoid being under direct sunlight when you can, and try to stay in shaded areas or in cool rooms.

When you go out, wear a hat or carry a parasol to block some of that sunlight, and try to avoid strenuous physical activities.

Keep a cool towel on your neck, or make use of the many products out there on the market to help prevent heatstroke!

And of course, be sure to drink plenty of water throughout the day.

Right now, we are still wearing masks to help prevent the spread of Covid-19, so it's sometimes harder to recognize when we are feeling thirsty, so make it a point to drink water at regular intervals.

 

Increase in Natural Disasters in Recent Years During Rainy Season and the Summer

From the beginning of rainy season, all the way to autumn, Japan experiences typhoons, heavy rains, flooding, fierce winds and storm surges.

And, in recent years, heavy rains have caused a series of disasters in Kyushu. To be prepared for this, check your area's disaster prevention map to know what actions to take in case of a disaster and to where you should evacuate. Knowing this information beforehand could make all the difference. You can check the website  https://www.city.fukuoka.lg.jp/bousai/bousaiforeigner.html or look up Fukuoka City Disaster Prevention to find the information you need on the internet.

2022.04.25[Mon] 09:00

DJ's Recommend(DJのオススメ)

【What are Your Golden Week Plans?】

Well, Golden Week, as they call this set of holidays coming up, will begin at the end of this week, the last week of April and go into the first week of May. If you were able to get next Monday and Friday off, then it'll be quite a long Golden Week for you!

Golden Week
So, do you know what the holidays are that make up this holiday time? It starts with Shōwa Day on April 29, Constitution Day on May 3, Greenery Day on May 4, and Children’s Day on May 5. And depending on how the timing works out and if you can get the non-holiday days off, this week can go from 7 to 10 days. Any idea why it's called Golden Week? There are quite a few theories as to where the name came from, but the most popular origin is that it came from Japanese radio lingo. Golden Time was an expression used in the radio industry to denote the period with the highest listener ratings. As there were many holidays concentrated in the week from the end of April to early May, many leisure-based industries experienced a spike in sales, including the film industry which prompted the managing director of one film company to dub the week "Golden Week" based on that radio lingo.
So what is your plan for this year's Golden Week? I'll start mine early, in a sense. I do still have to go to work but before the Golden Week rush begins, I plan on going to the Kawachi Fuji Park in Kitakyushu to enjoy the wisteria there. I have dinner plans with some friends that I haven't seen in a while and I'll also catch a bit of wrestling at Yahoo Dome at Dontaku Wrestling! It'll be a busy Golden Week for sure, but I want to make the most of it this year.

Places to Go in Fukuoka Over Golden Week
If you haven't made any plans yet, don't worry, there are lots of things to do here in Fukuoka City! Especially this year, after three long years, the Hakata Dontaku Minato Matsuri, a festival with over 800 years of history, will be held again!
The Hakata Dontaku Minato Matsuri is a parade in which men and women of all ages wear costumes of their choosing and parade through town while keeping beat on a shamoji. The festival is held on May 3 and 4 every year and there are stages and spaces around town where dance performances are also held. It's a wonderful event that makes the town even livelier.
And, if you want to do some shopping while on holiday, from today, April 25th, the new shopping complex LaLaPort Fukuoka is open. However, it's not just about shopping, there are also restaurants, a movie theater, sports facilities and loads of fun for those who have kids.

Fukuoka's East and West Coasts

Alright, for those of you who want to be outside, I would recommend cycling and a few other outdoor sports. Along the coast of Fukuoka there is tons to do and you've got both the east and west coasts, each with their own charms.

Looking to the East, there are beautiful blue seas all around and you can feel the history in the air if you visit Shikanoshima. The symbol of the island is Shika-umi Shrine located on a small mountain on the island. As you walk along the main path to the shrine, you can also sample fresh seafood and get some shopping in at shops along the way. The circumference of Shikanoshima is only 12 kilometers and it's an easy 1 hour cycle around.
There are paths for both beginners and more experienced cyclists.
You can take a boat from Bayside Place Hakata to the island and you can even bring your bicycle with you. If you don't have a bicycle, not to fear, you can rent one on the island or even one from Uminonakamichi, if you are out that way.

Now, to the West. There in the Kitazaki area, you'll find beautiful coastal roads and some great photo spots, along with stylish cafes. From Tenjin, it takes just about an hour to get to the Kitazaki area, but it's a real escape because you can go fishing, glamping, hit up some of those popular cafes I just mentioned and get lots of photos to post and share with friends.
If you go to the Itoshima Hanto, or Itoshima Peninsula, there are bicycles available to rent and also Stand Up Paddleboard, good fun for even beginners.
If you think you might head to the Kitazaki area, you can take the subway and JR Chikuhi line. Get off at Kyudai Gakkentoshi Eki Station and transfer to a Showa Bus.
You can find more information about all of this if you go to the Fukuoka City Tourist Information site, YokaNavi and search for Fukuoka East and West Coast.
And of course, when you do go out, make sure that you continue to practice basic infection prevention measures such as washing your hands, avoiding the 3 C's and wearing a mask. If you don't remember what those 3 C's are, they are avoiding closed spaces, crowds and close conversation.

 

2022.03.28[Mon] 09:00

DJ's Recommend(DJのオススメ)

【Cherry Blossom Viewing & The Start Of A New Season】

In Japan, the end of March through the beginning of April is, as you probably know, cherry blossom season. In parks and at schools, along the roads and in people's gardens, there are loads of places to see the cherry blossom trees in bloom. The period in which they bloom is pretty short, usually only about one or two weeks. In saying that, despite the briefness of this season, get out there and enjoy these beautiful blossoms.

【About Hanami- Cherry Blossom-viewing】

For people who live in Japan, cherry blossom viewing is a traditional and popular event. Friends and family and coworkers all get out during this time to sit under the cherry trees and enjoy that time together, eating, drinking and taking pictures. Going out to enjoy the cherry blossoms and taking time to see the bloom is really one of those things you have to do in Japan. Fortunately, here in Fukuoka, we have a ton of cherry blossom-viewing spots to enjoy.

【Cherry Blossom-viewing spots around Fukuoka City】

Well, to start with, there's Maizuru Park and Nishi Koen park, probably the two most well-known places in the city. However, there are many more to discover and enjoy and you can find a decent list of them in Fukuoka Now, a free informational magazine and site with information for foreigners in Fukuoka City. They have a special list during this season of several different spots. You can search for “cherry blossom fukuoka now” to find that list or check the Life in Fukuoka blog for the link to Fukuoka Now's guide. Check it out and make a day of it with your family, friends and partners under the cherry blossoms.

https://www.fukuoka-now.com/ja/fukuoka-sakura-and-ohanami-guide/

I usually do a hanami party in Maizuru Park every year, but I really enjoy the sight of the cherry blossoms lining the waterway near Tsutsumi-danchi in Sawara-ku. I'm also lucky to have a huge cherry tree in my garden, so I can actually do hanami at home.

Enjoying Cherry Blossom-viewing with the 3 C's.】

Covid-19 is still on the spread so as you enjoy this year's cherry blossoms, be sure to practice the 3 C's. Try to enjoy this time in small groups for shorter amounts of time and avoid big crowds. Make sure you also take all of your garbage home with you to keep things neat and tidy. It's only in this season that we can enjoy the bloom, so have a great time as you make memories under these beautiful trees.

【A Message for this New Season】

Life in Fukuoka started in April of 2020 which means from next week we are going into our third year! Thank you so much for listening to the program and to the Podcast these past two year. Please continue to tune in as we continue to share information about living in Fukuoka and bringing you information about different topics to help you enjoy your life here more.

We'd also like to hear from you! Send us a message if you have the chance to 761@lovefm.co.jp with the title Life in Fukuoka. Our program is on in English, Chinese, Korean, Nepali and Vietnamese each week and all of the Djs would love to hear from you. 

2022.02.28[Mon] 09:00

DJ's Recommend(DJのオススメ)

【Useful Info for Your New Life】

Well, whether it's for school or for work, in our lives there are a number of times when we've got to change things up and in Japan, that time is often the first of April when the new work and school year starts. School entrance ceremonies are held, students move to the next grade, people enter new companies or move to new positions or jobs. And during this time, a lot of people also move house.

So it's in February and March that a lot of that preparation happens as people get ready for a new chapter in their lives.

 

Moving in and out of Fukuoka City

Is there anyone listening today who is planning to move into Fukuoka City, or even out of Fukuoka City?

If you are moving, you need to submit notification of your move. Before moving, head to your local ward office to get the necessary paperwork for that.

You can also get more information about what you need when you are moving from the Official Fukuoka City Line account or from the Fukuoka City International Foundation's website. Take a look if you are planning a move.

 

I've never moved out of Fukuoka City, so fortunately there wasn't too much paperwork to do. I did have to go to my ward office to let them know that I had moved from one ward to another though, there wasn't too much paperwork involved in that. The other thing that I had to do, that was pretty important, was call the gas, electric and internet companies to let them know that I was moving and would need to stop service at one address and start service at my new address. It wasn't terribly difficult to do, but I do recall having to do it in Japanese and asking the customer service reps to speak slowly and with regular language so that I understood everything. I've never used a moving company, I am blessed to have good friends that have helped me move house, but I heard from a friend who did use a company that you can negotiate prices sometimes with the companies to get a better price. It's better to book earlier rather than later if you know when you need to move as April is a crazy time and you might not be able to get any company to help you.

If you are looking for boxes to pack things up, the supermarkets in the area usually have an area where you can take discarded cardboard boxes for free.

If you are just moving into Fukuoka for the first time, take a look on Fukuoka Now to see if anyone is leaving, You may be able to pick up some good deals on furniture and appliances that people are leaving behind. The secondhand shops and or recycle shops here are also good places to get decent furniture on a budget. Eco-Mall and Book-Off and Second Street are fairly well-known places, but Flea Market ACB and Treasure Factory are also great places to get furniture and appliances. There are also a number of smaller secondhand shops in the area full of good stuff, you've just got to search them up on a map.  I bought a Dyson vacuum just last month at one near Noke, got a folding camping wagon from the Book-Off in Maebaru, a nice side table with drawers two years ago from a Recycle Mart in Arita in Sawara-ku and a TV stand that would probably be 20,000 yen or so new for only 3000 yen from an ACB around Kotabe. If you don't have a car, many of them can arrange delivery for you.

 

Also, definitely check out past blogs and podcasts of Life in Fukuoka as we've shared lots of information before. And don't worry, we'll continue giving you information here to help make living in Fukuoka easier.

 

If you go to the Fukuoka City Website, you can also find a Life in Fukuoka digital pamphlet and video for more information on life here. It covers how to live safely and comfortably in Fukuoka City, where to go if you need advice when you have trouble, area information and rules and manners for living here. The website link is in the blog for today's program on Life in Fukuoka's page on the LOVE FM website https://www.city.fukuoka.lg.jp/soki/kokusai/shisei/seikatugaidansu/guidance.html

but if you want to take a look now, just search for Life in Fukuoka Video and Pamphlet and it will come up.

>> 続きを読む

2021.12.27[Mon] 09:00

DJ's Recommend(DJのオススメ)

【Look Back on 2021 & New Year's resolution】

Well, it is the last show of the year today as we are very quickly approaching 2022. How was the past year for you?
Mine was pretty good. Camping has become quite the popular activity over these last two years due to not being able travel internationally and so there has been a lot of focus on camping supplies in shops and online. As a result, I've found so much great camping equipment and managed to go camping a few times this year. There are so many wonderful campsites in Kyushu, we went to a few in the Kuju area and even did a camping van trip in Hokkaido this year. I think next year we'll continue with this new hobby of ours.
I also started a patisserie course at Nakamura Culinary School in Hirao. I'm always really impressed with the cakes and other confections I see at shops around town and decided to give it a try myself. We're only halfway through the course, but I've made so many different things and I think I'm getting better at it although recent attempts at cake decorating haven't been as good at home as at school.
Some exciting news over the year that happened in Japan was the opening of Super Nintendo World at USJ. Well, personally, I found it exciting. I don't really play games but grew up with Super Nintendo and Mario and it feels like my childhood come to life. I haven't been yet, but I'm planning on being there tomorrow. Fingers crossed it's everything I've always imagined it to be.
Generally speaking, I guess a lot happened around the world this year, some good, some bad. For me, I thought these two stories were nice. First, the Perserverence touched down on Mars back in February which was a huge event. And the mini helicopter Ingenuity that Perserverence carried to Mars even flew on the planet, which is just amazing technology. And, new animal species were discovered, including a tiny nano chameleon, small enough to sit on the tip of a person's finger.
At home in the US, the biggest news was that my great aunt turned 100! My family turned out to celebrate with her, they gave her a big surprise party. Otherwise, it was life as usual for the folks back home it seems.
There was a lot of other news but rather than reliving some of the things we'd probably rather forget, I guess it's time to move on to 2022. So what do you think 2022 will be like? Fingers crossed we can get out of this pandemic, I know there are a lot of people who haven't been able to meet friends and family in person due to travel restrictions and I hope next year that people will be able to meet up again. I imagine next year we'll see more technology, that seems to be changing so fast all the time anyway.
Is there anything you want to do in 2022? I'd like to learn how to bake bread like I see in the bakeries here, guess I'll have to find a good course for that. I'd also like to get my Japanese level up a bit higher, I took the JLPT exam earlier this month but I'm so out of practice that I don't think I did that well. I guess my new year's resolution is to study harder!
I guess we still have a few more days before we have to make our new year's resolutions though, plenty of time to think about what to do in the new year.

Well, enjoy these last few days of 2021 whatever you do, whether it's a bit of travel, spending time with family and friends or getting some quiet “me” time in.
Thank you as well for joining me throughout the year for Life in Fukuoka. I hope the information has been useful and interesting for you.
There will be plenty more of it next year as well, so hopefully we can continue helping you out with information on how to make life a little more comfortable here in Fukuoka City.

>> 続きを読む

2021.11.22[Mon] 09:00

DJ's Recommend(DJのオススメ)

【Christmas Events and Illuminations】

You may have noticed that in Japan, the moment Halloween ends, Christmas decorations and promotions show up everywhere. I actually saw one of my local supermarkets getting the Christmas sweet packs out on the floor on Halloween! For me, growing up in the US, holiday decorations didn't go up until we got through Thanksgiving, which in the US is the 4th Thursday of November. This year, that will be this coming Thursday the 25th.  Anyway, in the US, my family would usually get our Christmas tree up the first or second week of December. My dad wasn't the type to rush into these things, we usually bought a live tree and if you put it up too early, by Christmas we'd have lost a lot of pine needles, as we were terrible about remembering to water it. Christmas morning meant stockings, then breakfast and then presents. My sister and I used to wake up so early just to go into the living room to look at the Christmas lights and see all the presents Santa had brought us. In the afternoon, we always went to my aunt's house where the whole family gathered for a potluck, more presents and a couple good games of poker. In Japan, my Christmas is a bit quieter, but I do still put up a tree and decorations. In past years, I'd invite friends around to celebrate with me and I'm hoping to do so this year if everything looks alright. I usually cook a big main meal, a few years back I did Beef Wellington, another year it was ham, I've done roast chicken and most recently I did a beautiful crispy slab of pork belly. Mashed potatoes and gravy are a must, mashed potatoes are easy to make but I know gravy is sometimes a mystery for Japanese people. It's easy to make, the simplest way would be to make a roux with flour and butter. Add a consomme bouillon cube and hot water, mix and simmer until thickened. It will give you an idea of what gravy is. For real gravy though, you need to roast some meat and take the drippings to make the gravy base. I like to add sauteed onions and mushrooms to the gravy and lots of herbs like thyme, sage and parsley. There are recipes online so if you want to try something different for Christmas, just find a recipe that suits your fancy!

 

 

Christmas Illuminations

Well, all this talk about Christmas has me all excited for the season now! I guess going out to see some of the Christmas illuminations around the city will put me in the holiday spirit even more. All around Tenjin and Hakata, shops and even some houses are brightly adorned with lights and other holiday decorations. Some places change up their decorations every year with different themes depending on what they are doing and others keep it consistent, and something to look forward to every year. Getting hot wine like at the Christmas market is probably the smarter thing to do. Enjoy the lights and stay warm!

 

 

Illuminations Around Fukuoka

There are quite a few places to see Christmas Illuminations around the city and one handy guide for foreigners with that information is Fukuoka Now, a free monthly magazine. There are usually lots of pictures and it's pretty easy to understand where to go. Take a look and head out for those bright lights with your partner, friends, family or even on your own!  You can find the magazine online if you look up Fukuoka Now.

https://www.fukuoka-now.com/ja/fukuoka-winter-illumination-guide/

 

 

The Christmas Market

I mentioned getting hot wine at the Christmas Market a bit earlier, so if you were wondering about that, well, in Fukuoka, every year from November to December 25th, there are Christmas Markets set up in Hakata and Tenjin that really give you that wonderful cozy winter feeling. It is the largest Christmas Market in Japan, set up over a few different places with stalls lined up under the Christmas decorations and lights. You'll find a range of delicious drinks like hot chocolate and that hot wine I mentioned,  as well as a pretty good menu of foods to try. It's a fun event and this year the markets will be set up at the square in front of Hakata Station and Fureai Hiroba Square in front of Fukuoka City Hall in Tenjin.

There will also be a light up in Nakasu called “Nakasu Kibo no Hikari” which started last year. The trees along the road in Nakasu are lit up from 5pm to midnight, making it another spot to enjoy.

2021.10.25[Mon] 09:00

DJ's Recommend(DJのオススメ)

【Halloween】

Well, as you know, Sunday, October 31st is Halloween! Yay!

The Origins of Halloween

Halloween is a  tradition that originated with the ancient Celtic festival of Samhain, when people would light bonfires and wear costumes to ward off ghosts that they believed would appear on the night of October 31st.  Nowadays, any connections it had to religion are fading and it has become popular in a number of countries as a time when kids dress up in scary costumes and get sweets, and people enjoy scary events like haunted houses and horror shows. In the US, Halloween is a huge event, people seem to start getting ready for it as soon as September ends. I remember getting really excited for caramel-covered apple flavored lollipops and trips to haunted houses and haunted mazes with my friends when I was in high school and university. When I was even younger in elementary school, planning my costume and then going trick or treating was the highlight of the month. The scary thing was when my father would find my candy bag and eat all the Reeses peanut butter cups. He was, and still is, a chocolate monster!

 

Halloween In Japan

In Japan, various events are held across the country as the holiday has become more popular and many people often hold parties with their friends. And of course, if it's going to be a Halloween Party, dressing up is an absolute must. Of course a witch or monster costume is typically the standard but in recent years, characters from movies and especially in Japan, from anime or games have become inspiration for many costumes. And as each year has passed, there are more and more ideas making Halloween a great time for all.

 

Costume Trends This Year

So what is this year's costume trend, I wonder. Well, if you take a look at popular anime and movies on now, you'll probably have a good idea. We had the Olympics and Paralympics this year as well, so you might be able to find costume inspiration there. Naturally, you can't go wrong with a witch or monster costume but you could also try a costume based in reality, dressing up to show the humour of every day situations and how scary things can be. Dress up as a Zoom meeting participant still in your pajamas or someone at a supermarket who forgot to bring a shopping bag and is trying to carry every thing with out one. I'm not quite sure what I'll get up to this year, I have enough stuff in my house to put together a Halloween costume, thanks to Halloweens in years past, but I'm not sure that I'll go out. I actually might just have a little dinner party at home with my partner, there are a lot of fun, spooky recipes online to try. I suggest witches fingers, sausage mummies or deviled egg eyeballs if you are looking for some Halloween party foods. Just search online and you'll see what I'm talking about!

 

Practice the 3 C's This Halloween!

Like last year, Covid-19 still hasn't let up, which is pretty scary in itself, so make sure you practice the 3 C's as you celebrate Halloween this year, the easiest way of doing that is by holding a online party at home. You can get a ton of different Halloween themed sweets and decorations at the supermarket and convenience store these days and food delivery services have increased since last year so it's actually pretty easy to stay at home. Anyway, stay safe and have a great Halloween whether you celebrate with family or friends.

<< previous next >>

DJ紹介

  • Colleen
  • Colleen
  • 誕生日:11月11日
    出身地:USA Detroit, MI
    興味のある事:I'm studying patisserie and languages
    好きな音楽:Rock、Classical、Swing、Pop
    趣味・特技:ハイキング、写真、キャンプ、旅行
    SNSアカウント:Instagram@indybinks

番組ページへ

リクエスト&メッセージ